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May 20, 2007

In your own backyard

Time for a pop quiz! No, I’m not going to have you try and guess the combined tonnage of Rosie O’Donnell and Michael Moore, but it is something that will tax your brain just the same. What are the 7 Wonders of North America? And if you say, “The combined tonnage of Rosie and Moore”- you fail. How many of them have you visited?

This idea came to me as I read the back of the Tasteeos cereal box, a blatant knock off of another popular but tasteless cereal. While it was refreshing to read something other than desperate attempts to get children to keep pestering their parents for the sweet and expensive cereal, I was reminded of a story I read about the Islamofacists and their jihad to control the world with their 7th century lifestyle.

The article, in its entirety is an excellent recount of both Western and Eastern art, music, and architecture and how Muslims reject these influences. The article, found in The Brussels Journal, entitled Why Western Art is Unique, and Why Muslim Immigration Threatens It gives an excellent summation in this paragraph:

As a European, I fear for the future of the Louvre in Paris, the National Gallery in London, the Rijksmuseum in Amsterdam and Michelangelo's paintings in the Sistine Chapel in Rome. There is every reason to believe that they will end up the same way as the Bamiyan Buddhas. Although it may not happen today, tomorrow or even the day after tomorrow, sooner or later, pious Muslims will burn these works of art, and doubtlessly consider it their sacred duty. Muslim immigration now threatens many of the masterworks of the Western tradition of art, the most inventive and groundbreaking mankind has ever seen, with annihilation. History will never forgive us for our cowardice and stupidity if we allow these treasures to be destroyed just because we think history is boring or don't want to say anything unfashionable about other cultures.


Without further doddling…


Sequoia National Park – Home to 35 groves of Sequoia trees, this California park also houses granite mountains and deep canyons. But the biggest attraction is the General Sherman Tree. It is a sequoia, standing 272 feet high and measuring 37 feet in diamter. It is the largest and one of the oldest living things in the world… estimated to be over 3500 years old.



Garden of the Gods- Located near Colorado Springs, Colorado, the Garden of the Gods is a breathtaking collection of unusually shaped, multicolored sandstone formations. These formations have unique names such as Kissing Camels and Balanced Rock. The area of the garden known as Grey Rock serves as a naturally made amphitheater.



Natural Bridge National Monument- Two winding streams in Utah carved three natural bridges from the sandstone that once stood there. The three bridges are called Sipapu (220 feet high), Kachina (210 feet high), and Owachomo (106 feet high) and have spans ranging from 180-268 feet long.



Old Faithful- The most famous geyser in Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming is named Old Faithful because it spouts quite regularly, about every 33 to 120 minutes. When that occurs, roughly 10,000 gallons of water from the geyser shoot up an average of 150 feet high.



Niagara Falls- The falls are on the Niagara River, on the border of Ontario, Canada and New York State. The Canadian side of the falls, called Horseshoe Falls, rises up 167 feet from the river, and the American Falls, on the US side, read a height of 176 feet. The water from both falls flows into Lake Ontario.



Yosemite Valley- The valley is within Yosemite National Park in California. The valley contains sheer rock walls, cut from glaciers, Yosemite Falls- the highest in North America with a drop of 2,425 feet- and huge domes and peaks. The greatest of these is El Capitan, a granite buttress that rises 3,604 feet from the valley floor.



Mammoth Cave- Mammoth Cave Park is made up of 52,830 acres of land in south central Kentucky. Mammoth Cave is the longest recorded cave system in the world, with over 354 miles of known, mapped passages.

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